Penang Street Art (The Rotan Cane Sculpture)

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This steel rod art sculpture can be found beside the wall of a rattan shop in Chulia Street, George Town. The caricature depicts a mother buying a rattan cane while a boy was hiding behind the bush, for fear of the cane (or locally known as “rotan”). The rattan cane was commonly used as a ‘disciplinary tool’ back at home and in school during the old days.

Penang Street Art (Lumut Lane Sculpture)

Lumut Lane Sculpture

An art sculpture made of steel rods found at the back of an old shophouse’s wall at Lumut Lane, George Town. The sculpture’s caricature reveals that Lumut Lane is also the birthplace of novelist Ahmad Rashid Talu (born in 1889), who wrote the first Malay novel incorporating local settings and characters.

Penang Street Art (The Bread Seller)

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This steel sculpture can be found on a wall of a shophouse along King Street, part of the Little India area in George Town. The caricature depicts a local ‘Roti Benggali’ (or Benggali Bread) seller and what it means by the word ‘Benggali’. The freshly baked and rather big loaf Benggali bread is popular among the locals here, usually sold from a small makeshift stall on a motorcycle. It was said that the bread derived its name from the word ‘Penggali’, which basically means ‘shareholders’ in Tamil. The bread business was started by an Indian Muslim together with his group of friends (a co-op business) back in the 1930s. Local residents later mistook the name to be ‘Roti Benggali’ and the bread has been called as such ever since.

Penang Street Art (The Fortune Teller)

This steel rod art sculpture can be found at a wall of a corner building located at the junction of King Street and China Street.
It depicts the Indian fortune tellers in the old days who used a green parakeet to foretell a person’s future.