Butterworth Bagan: Sree Maha Mariamman Devasthanam Hindu Temple

Sree Maha Mariamman Devasthanam Hindu Temple is an old and historical Hindu temple located at the Bagan Luar area in Butterworth. The temple was found to have originated from a small hut built by the local Hindu community here in 1853 as a place of worship for the Hindu mother deity Amman. Subsequently, the temple underwent additional renovation and expansion into a beautiful and impressive temple complex today.

Penang Isle: Wat Chayamangkalaram Buddhist Thai Temple

Wat Chayamangkalaram (also known as the Sleeping Buddha or Reclining Buddha Temple) is a Thai temple located at the Burma Road area of Pulau Tikus, Penang. It was found to have been built in 1845 on a piece of land granted to the Siamese community in George Town by Queen Victoria, and also houses one of the world’s longest reclining Buddha statues. The temple is one of the main highlights of Penang tourism places, attracting both locals and foreigners.

Today also marks the birth of the Buddha, the Vesak Day.

Noordin Street: Tow Moo Keong Temple


Originated as a small shrine along Noordin Street in George Town, the Tow Moo Keong temple is built as a place of worship for Tow Moo, a Chinese deity known usually as the goddess of the heavens. The temple features detailed sculptures of dragons and heavenly entities of the Chinese lore.

The Jade Emperor Temple

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The Jade Emperor Temple at the foot of Penang Hill.

During the ninth day of the Chinese New Year, Chinese Hokkien people will be celebrating the birthday of the Jade Emperor. This day is also known as the Hokkien people’s new year, and has its origin back during the Song Dynasty where Chinese Hokkien refugees were saved from being caught and killed by the Mongols on the same day of the Jade Emperor’s birthday. Hence, as gratitude and believing that the Jade Emperor had saved them, the Hokkien people soon marked this day as an important festival to be celebrated.

Most Chinese in Penang are Hokkiens, so this day is usually celebrated more widely (and ‘loudly’) here than the first day of Chinese New Year.